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Biochemistry Jobs - What are the opportunities after graduating?

Publish Date: 07-09-2017
Sector: Biotechnology
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Country: The Netherlands

Biochemistry Jobs - What are the opportunities after graduating?

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Biochemistry is a collective noun and therefore we’d like to go more in-depth on the sector itself and what the opportunities are. If you are looking for a career at the crossroads between biology and medicine, then biochemistry could be interesting for you. 
 

Biochemistry Job options

The work field within the Biochemistry is broad. Jobs directly related to a Biochemistry degree include:

  • Analytical chemist
  • Biomedical scientist
  • Healthcare scientist, clinical biochemistry
  • Clinical research associate
  • Forensic scientist
  • Research scientist (Life Science)
  • Scientific laboratory technician
  • Toxicologist

 

Work experience with Biochemistry jobs

During your studies you’ve developed practical and technical skills through laboratory-based work and the final year research project. This all to prepare you for a research or a technical position. After graduating you can improve your chances by obtaining some relevant work experience, for example an internship, in a research laboratory or company.

Some universities provide a four-year undergraduate course that already includes an industry/research placement year, usually undertaken in the Pharmaceutical or Biotechnical industry or a research institute. Work placements help to further develop the key skills and provide opportunities for building contacts and networking.

Whatever your career plans are (or even if you don't have any yet), it is important to enhance your degree with extra skills and experiences which show that you are a proactive person engaging with the world around you.

 

Further study

One in every six graduates is working as a laboratory technician, biochemists or medical scientist six months after graduating. Almost 40% of graduates are undertaking further study or combining further study and work.

It is common for Biochemists to continue their higher education if they are intending to develop a career in the Biosciences. A PhD is essential for academic research or to secure a career as an academic lecturer. Even for those entering research in industry or associated careers such as publishing, science communication or clinical careers, further qualifications are an asset and increasingly essential.

If you are aiming for a career path away from science, for example in teaching, law, finance or other non-scientific careers, consider what kind of professional qualifications may stand you in good stead for getting into your chosen career. With a Biochemistry degree you can also apply for graduate entry to medicine, dentistry and veterinary science.

 

What skills should be on your CV to qualify yourself for Biochemistry jobs?

During your degree you develop specific skills associated with Biochemistry. The most important skills that should be at least mentioned on your CV are:

  • The ability to understand complex biological processes;
  • Having a full and critical understanding of relevant texts;
  • Assembling arguments and engaging in debate;
  • Critical and analytical skills;
  • Independent thinking and problem-solving.

Other general skills include:

  • practical skills;
  • numeracy;
  • communication, presentation and IT skills;
  • teamwork;
  • self-management and professional development.

You can demonstrate your experience in these areas by giving examples from the practical work and group projects included in your degree course.
 

Typical employers

The distinction can be made between employers that are working in the public sector or within the industry itself.


The main employers of biochemistry graduates in the public sector are:

  • research institutes;
  • universities;
  • government departments;
  • the National Health Service;
  • forensic science services; and the
  • Environment Agency.

Biochemistry graduates are also employed in industry itself. Typical employers include pharmaceutical, biotechnology, food, water and agricultural companies. Small companies employ biochemists to provide specialist services, such as toxicological studies.

Other employers include scientific and medical publishers and the Intellectual Property Office (as patent examiners).
 

Make yourself known

Biochemists are wide spread within the Life Sciences industry. Their opportunities can be divers and since it relates to more industries, a larger amount of professionals are in the market for these jobs. At least they think they are. At the end it is the employer that seeks the right candidates. A typical method to find suitable candidates is therefore CV database search. This gives the employer the tools to search within a pool of CV’s to find matching candidates.

This means that it is important that the employers within the Biochemistry are able to find you. If you also like to be found by relevant employers, we advise you to upload your CV for free. On top of that you can also subscribe to a job alert for all Biochemistry jobs!

 

UPLOAD YOUR CV


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